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A Tutorial Introduction to The arch Revision Control System

Post date: November 27, 2005, 22:11 Category: Software Views: 2702 Comments
Tutorial quote: arch is a revision control, source code management, and configuration management tool.

This manual is an arch tutorial: its purpose is to help you get started using arch for the first time, and then learn some of the more advanced features of arch.
Unix+clones

Ripping DVDs to Divx with mencoder (mplayer)

Post date: November 26, 2005, 18:11 Category: Multimedia Views: 4220 Comments
Tutorial quote: We can do it in two ways, direct ripping to the .avi or doing "three pass encoding". Here we'll talk about direct ripping.
Unix+clones

Performance Tuning with GCC, Part 1

Post date: November 26, 2005, 01:11 Category: Optimizing Views: 3505 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article provides an overview of the different flags controlling optimization in GCC and some hints on how to use them to get the most performance out of your application. In particular, it discusses some of the new optimization features of the GCC 4.x series included in Fedora™ Core 4 and the upcoming Red Hat® Enterprise Linux® versions.
Unix+clones

Keyboard shortcuts: Faster than the speed of mouse

Post date: November 26, 2005, 00:11 Category: Miscellaneous Views: 2582 Comments
Tutorial quote: My computer set-up is suboptimal. My desk is too high for me to type on comfortably. My workaround? I type with my keyboard on my lap. That puts the keyboard at just the right height and is kinder to my wrists. My mouse, however, has to sit on my desk. Using my mouse involves moving my hand a foot in each direction.

While this action might conceivably bulk up my arm muscles, I would rather not do my arm exercises while at my computer. Using the mouse is time consuming, distracting, and, most importantly, less ergonomic. While your computer may be better situated than mine, chances are you, too, would work faster if you did not have to use your mouse.

To minimize my mouse use, I learned many of the keyboard bindings for various applications. Many applications use similar bindings, making them even easier to remember.

I have compiled a list of keyboard bindings here for some of the more prevalent applications. Feel free to print them out and keep them next to your computer. It may take you a little time to remember them, but once you do, you will wonder how you ever did without.
Unix+clones

Teach Yourself Perl 5 in 21 days

Post date: November 24, 2005, 20:11 Category: Programming Views: 4236 Comments
Tutorial quote: No previous programming experience is required for you to learn everything you need to know about programming with Perl from this book. In particular, no knowledge of the C programming language is required. If you are familiar with other programming languages, learning Perl will be a snap. The only assumption this book does make is that you are familiar with the basics of using the UNIX operating system.
Unix+clones

Setup the SSH server to use keys for authentication

Post date: November 16, 2005, 20:11 Category: Network Views: 3076 Comments
Tutorial quote: The user creates a keypair, which consists of a private key, that can be protected with a passphrase, and a public key. The public key is transfered to the server and the private key is kept in our workstation. We assume that the user has accounts in both the server machine and his workstation. Everytime he tries to connect to the server, the keys are validated and the user is granted access.
Unix+clones

How To Configure E 16.7.x

Post date: October 9, 2005, 18:10 Category: Software Views: 2760 Comments
Tutorial quote: This file documents the configuration files used in Enlightenment 16.7.x but may not match 100% with earlier or later versions. This is a work in progress and will be updated as I learn more and have the time.
Unix+clones

Keeping Your Life in Subversion

Post date: October 2, 2005, 16:10 Category: Software Views: 3238 Comments
Tutorial quote: I keep my life in a Subversion repository. For the past five years, I've checked every file I've created and worked on, every email I've sent or received, and every config file I've tweaked into revision control. Five years ago, when I started doing this using CVS, people thought I was nuts to use revision control in this way. Today it's still not a common practice, but thanks to my earlier article "CVS homedir" (Linux Journal, issue 101), I know I'm not alone. In this article I will describe how my new home directory setup is working now that I've switched from CVS to Subversion.

Subversion is a revision-control system. Like the earlier and much cruftier CVS, its purpose is to manage chunks of code, such as free software programs with multiple developers, or in-house software projects involving several employees. Unlike CVS, Subversion handles directories and file renaming reasonably, which is more than sufficient reason to switch to it if you're already using CVS. It also fixes most of CVS's other misfeatures. Subversion still has its warts, though, such as an inability to store symbolic links and some file permissions, and its need for twice as much disk space as you'd expect thanks to the copies of everything in those .svn directories. These problems can be quite annoying when you're keeping your whole home directory in svn. Why bother?
Unix+clones

Learn REXX fast

Post date: September 1, 2005, 01:09 Category: Programming Views: 3175 Comments
Tutorial quote: If you’ve programmed under IBM operating systems, you’ve undoubtedly heard of Rexx. Rexx is the scripting and command language IBM bundles with all its mainframe, mid-range, and lower-end operating systems. What you might not be aware of is that Rexx also runs on almost every other operating system in the known universe. You can download Rexx free for all versions of Windows®, Linux, UNIX®, BSD, Mac OS, and DOS, and many other systems. It even runs on the three major operating systems for handheld devices: Windows CE, Palm OS, and Symbian/EPOC32.

What this means is, if you learn Rexx, you’ll know a scripting language that runs everywhere from mainframes to handhelds—and everything in between. Rexx is a general-purpose language that's powerful enough for mainframes yet flexible enough for other platforms. Best of all, Rexx is easy to learn.
Unix+clones

Unattended, Encrypted, Incremental Network Backups

Post date: August 12, 2005, 18:08 Category: Network Views: 3135 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article describes a complete system for creating a centralised backup system, complete with strong encryption. Incremental backups are used to minimize the bandwidth, and time, used.
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