Go back to fronty page View most popular entries View latest additions Submit tutorials to UnixTutorials.info
UnixTutorials logo

Benchmarks related tutorials

Unix+clones

MySQL Master Master Repliction

Post date: September 18, 2006, 14:09 Category: Benchmarks Views: 5594 Comments
Tutorial quote: When we need to replication mysql servers with each other some time for synchronizing for HA. In my case I need the mysql servers for which two masters must be synchronized with each other so that if any one drops down, other could take care of the one and data must not be lost. Similarly when one goes up, it will still be used as slave for the live one.

Here is a basic step by step tutorial, that will cover the mysql master and slave replication and also will describe the mysql master and master replication.
Debian

Filesystems (ext3, reiser, xfs, jfs) comparison on Debian Etch

Post date: April 23, 2006, 08:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 5561 Comments
Tutorial quote: There are a lot of Linux filesystems comparisons available but most of them are anecdotal, based on artificial tasks or completed under older kernels. This benchmark essay is based on 11 real-world tasks appropriate for a file server with older generation hardware (Pentium II/III, EIDE hard-drive).
Debian

Software RAID and Encrypted Filesystem Benchmarks

Post date: January 25, 2006, 23:01 Category: Benchmarks Views: 4534 Comments
Tutorial quote: Both tests use bonnie++ to test the disks.

- Files Test: create, destroy, and stat 20,000 files in sequential and random order. File sizes are random between 0K and 15k. All files are created in a single directory.
- IO Test: read, write, rewrite, and seek in three 1GB size files.
- Load: all tests are starting with 0 cpu load. Load was then measured every 2 seconds for the duration of the test and averaged over all measurements.
Linux

Benchmarking Filesystems Part II

Post date: January 6, 2006, 22:01 Category: Benchmarks Views: 4514 Comments
Tutorial quote: After the last article was published, I have received more than a dozen requests for a second filesystem benchmark using the 2.6 kernel. Since that time, I have converted entirely to XFS for every Linux machine I use, so I may be a bit bias regarding the XFS filesystem. I tried to keep the hardware roughly the same. Instead of a Western Digital 250GB and Promise ATA/100 controller, I am now am using a Seagate 400GB and Maxtor ATA/133 Promise controller. The physical machine remains the same, there is an additional 664MB of swap and I am now running Debian Etch. In the previous article, I was running Slackware 9.1 with custom compiled filesystem utilities. I've added a small section in the beginning that shows the filesystem creation and mount time, I've also added a graph showing these new benchmarks. After the first round of benchmarks, I received a sleuth of e-mails asking for the raw numbers. The numbers are now included in tables at the end of this e-mail for both the last and current set of benchmarks.
RedHat

Choosing an I/O Scheduler for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4

Post date: July 18, 2005, 22:07 Category: Benchmarks Views: 7103 Comments
Tutorial quote: The Linux kernel, the core of the operating system, is responsible for controlling disk access by using kernel I/O scheduling. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 with a 2.4 kernel base uses a single, robust, general purpose I/O elevator. The 2.4 I/O scheduler has a reasonable number of tuning options by controlling the amount of time a request remains in an I/O queue before being serviced using the elvtune command. While Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 offers most workloads excellent performance, it does not always provide the best I/O characteristics for the wide range of applications in use by Linux users these days. The I/O schedulers provided in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, embedded in the 2.6 kernel, have advanced the I/O capabilities of Linux significantly. With Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, applications can now optimize the kernel I/O at boot time, by selecting one of four different I/O schedulers.
Unix+clones

Benchmarking BSD and Linux

Post date: June 18, 2005, 22:06 Category: Benchmarks Views: 3435 Comments
Tutorial quote: These benchmarks are the result of my scalable network programming research. My interest in this area is to see how scalable and fast network applications can be on standard PC hardware.

I have done most of my research on Linux 2.4, 2.5 and 2.6 kernels using a home-grown distribution I affectionately call "Leanux". I have experimented with several APIs and methods to try and get the most scalability and performance out of a web server. The ultimate goal, however, is to demonstrate scalability by surviving a Slashdotting.
Unix+clones

X Window Manager Benchmarks (E17 on Top)

Post date: June 9, 2005, 14:06 Category: Benchmarks Views: 3589 Comments
Tutorial quote: I've been focusing on some stability issues of late in E17, but more importantly - speed. I've been doing a little profiling and shaving off cycles where I can find readily optimizable code. I have E17 starting in 0.52 seconds (from execute to usable desktop). Considering that involves loading and rendering and scaling a complex multi-leayered desktop background, loading multiple useful modules (pager, ibar, start, dropshadow, cpufreq handler, clock, etc.), then that's not too bad.

Now I'm a numbers man. I like numbers. I don't like vague "it's faster than X" or "that's slower than this" statements without numbers to back it up. I also like to play fair. Also given there are no "performance suites" i know of that measure window manager performance, I wrote a quick and dirty one.
Unix+clones

Apple's G5 versus x86, Mac OS X versus Linux

Post date: June 4, 2005, 03:06 Category: Benchmarks Views: 2931 Comments
Tutorial quote: This article is written solely from the frustration that I could not get a clear picture on what the G5 and Mac OS X are capable of. So, be warned; this is not an all-round review. It is definitely the worst buyer’s guide that you can imagine. This article cares about speed, performance, and nothing else! No comments on how well designed the internals are, no elaborate discussions about user friendliness, out-of-the-box experience and other subjective subjects. But we think that you should have a decent insight to where the G5/Mac OS X combination positions itself when compared to the Intel & AMD world at the end of this article.
OSX

Panther versus Tiger

Post date: April 30, 2005, 00:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 2923 Comments
Tutorial quote: According to Apple, "...unmodified applications that use the system math functions will get an automatic performance boost on the G5..." when switching from Panther to Tiger. We decided to run some tests to see if we got a speed gain right out of the box with applications that we suspect use system math functions.
Linux

NPTL vs. NPGT vs. LinuxThreads

Post date: April 24, 2005, 09:04 Category: Benchmarks Views: 2835 Comments
Tutorial quote: Ulrich Drepper recently offered some interesting benchmark results, comparing the time it takes to create and destroy threads with different threading models under various conditions. The tests were run using a 2.5.37 development kernel, comparing LinuxThreads, NGPT 2.0.2 and NPTL 0.1.
Web-based applications and online marketing solutions - LumoLink