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Unix+clones Installing and securing Squid
Post date: March 13, 2006, 09:03 Category: Software Views: 2028 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Squid is a high-performance proxy caching server for web clients, supporting FTP, gopher, and HTTP data objects. Unlike traditional caching software, Squid handles all requests in a single, non-blocking, I/O-driven process. Squid keeps meta data and especially hot objects cached in RAM, caches DNS lookups, supports non-blocking DNS lookups, and implements negative caching of failed requests. Squid supports SSL, extensive access controls, and full request logging. By using the lightweight Internet Cache Protocol, Squid caches can be arranged in a hierarchy or mesh for additional bandwidth savings.

After the installation and base configuration of squid we will add another layer of security by chrooting it.
Unix+clones HOW TO: Setup RoundCube Webmail on Your Server
Post date: February 28, 2006, 01:02 Category: Software Views: 3096 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: I recently heard about a new webmail client from my friend Justin, who’s infatuated with it. RoundCube, a “browser-based multilingual IMAP client with an application-like user interface,” is the latest and greatest webmail client.
Unix+clones Easy Automated Snapshot-Style Backups with Linux and Rsync
Post date: January 31, 2006, 18:01 Category: Software Views: 1062 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This document describes a method for generating automatic rotating "snapshot"-style backups on a Unix-based system, with specific examples drawn from the author's GNU/Linux experience. Snapshot backups are a feature of some high-end industrial file servers; they create the illusion of multiple, full backups per day without the space or processing overhead. All of the snapshots are read-only, and are accessible directly by users as special system directories. It is often possible to store several hours, days, and even weeks' worth of snapshots with slightly more than 2x storage. This method, while not as space-efficient as some of the proprietary technologies (which, using special copy-on-write filesystems, can operate on slightly more than 1x storage), makes use of only standard file utilities and the common rsync program, which is installed by default on most Linux distributions. Properly configured, the method can also protect against hard disk failure, root compromises, or even back up a network of heterogeneous desktops automatically.
Debian Rolling your own Debian packages (part 1)
Post date: January 21, 2006, 00:01 Category: Software Views: 822 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This two-part article explains how to make a Debian package of simple piece of software, presumably something you have written yourself. Although building a new package is more complex than rebuilding one or having one generated, the idea is that it is actually surprisingly simple to create basic Debian packages. In fact, if you can make software install into a temporary installation tree, you're already 90% done! This text provides a quick alternative to the more comprehensive Debian New Maintainers' Guide. Only knowledge of Makefiles and the basic Debian package tools is assumed.

The first part of this article will continue with some preliminary information about Debian packages. In the second part we walk through a concrete packaging example.
Unix+clones Behind the Scenes with Apache’s .htaccess
Post date: January 15, 2006, 23:01 Category: Software Views: 961 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Although I’m a designer and not a programmer or server-side specialist, for a few years I’ve used Apache’s .htaccess to a limited degree for clients' websites, primarily for simple URL redirects and setting up custom error pages. Now that I can use Apache’s .htaccess for my own websites, I’ve been immersed in learning more about how to use this powerful tool conservatively but effectively to redirect URLs and to combat spammers and bad bots. Today’s post provides links to some of the online sources that I’ve found especially helpful.
Debian Monitoring your hardware's temperature
Post date: January 5, 2006, 03:01 Category: Software Views: 1081 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Sometimes it is useful to know the temperature of your hardware, to prevent it from frying. This information can easily be found, if your hardware provides the sensors needed, and we have the necessary software.

Most computers come with temperature sensors, which can be used to prevent your hardware from excessive heat. The most important thing to watch is, of course, your CPU temperature. This is where lm-sensors comes in.
Debian Giving your Xen instances a working X setup
Post date: January 2, 2006, 22:01 Category: Software Views: 863 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Xen, the virtualisation system, is a great tool for running fresh copies of an operating system. However it doesn't allow you to run X11 programs. Here we can fix that with the help of VNC.
Gentoo Installing GoogleEarth with wine
Post date: December 31, 2005, 00:12 Category: Software Views: 1811 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Installation of GoogleEarth on Gentoo is quite easy when you know exactly what to do. In fact there are many users posting on the wine bugtracker only because they miss some WINEDLLOVERRIDES or don't set the right Windows version at the right moment.
Debian Creating a Wiki with kwiki
Post date: December 17, 2005, 16:12 Category: Software Views: 846 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Wikis are simple interactive websites which are extremely easy to use for storing easily updated text content. Using a Wiki you can easily create a lot of content with hyperlinks between them. Debian has packaged several different Wiki systems and here we'll look at installing just one of them: KWiki.

Wikis have become familiar to many people thanks to the popularity of large sites such as Wikipedia and can be very useful for creating collaborative websites.

Whilst there are many Wiki packages included in the Debian GNU/Linux distribution I've always had a soft spot for KWiki due to its simplicity, Perl nature, and low requirements.

Installing the software under Debian is very simple and we will show how to setup a new installation using the Debian Apache2 webserver package.
Gentoo HOWTO Apache2 and Tomcat5
Post date: December 16, 2005, 17:12 Category: Software Views: 2144 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Quick guide for installing Tomcat5 for Apache2.