Go back to fronty page View most popular entries View latest additions Submit tutorials to UnixTutorials.info
UnixTutorials logo

Software related tutorials

Unix+clones How To Set Up Database Replication In MySQL
Post date: December 14, 2005, 13:12 Category: Software Views: 1129 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This tutorial describes how to set up database replication in MySQL. MySQL replication allows you to have an exact copy of a database from a master server on another server (slave), and all updates to the database on the master server are immediately replicated to the database on the slave server so that both databases are in sync. This is not a backup policy because an accidentally issued DELETE command will also be carried out on the slave; but replication can help protect against hardware failures though.

In this tutorial I will show how to replicate the database exampledb from the master with the IP address 192.168.0.100 to a slave. Both systems (master and slave) are running Debian Sarge; however, the configuration should apply to almost all distributions with little or no modification.
Unix+clones OpenOffice 2.0: Creating database forms
Post date: December 13, 2005, 06:12 Category: Software Views: 917 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: ather than having a shallow affair with OpenOffice 2.0, we can use it to get a little more intimate with the data. We can even badger it into forming relations. Why force your database tables into a marriage with OpenOffice? Because, as with human relations, life -- and data -- are pretty meaningless without tight connections.

This tip on creating forms is part of a series I'm writing on OpenOffice.org 2.0 Base. So far, I've discussed making a plain database from scratch, creating tables, entering data using the table editor and a simple form and creating a view of a table or tables.

Let's start off with a description of what table relations are anyway, then discuss how to create a data entry form like this one, which has data from two related tables.
SuSe User-Mode Linux
Post date: December 8, 2005, 07:12 Category: Software Views: 1402 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: One of the largest efforts involved with software engineering is testing the software to make sure that it works as designed. Testing can require several different types of system configurations and could require multiple instances of Linux. One way to create this type of environment is to use a virtual machine.

User-Mode Linux (UML) is a fully functional Linux kernel. It runs its own scheduler and virtual memory (VM) system, relying on the host kernel for hardware support. It includes virtual block, network, and serial devices to provide an environment that is almost as full-featured as a hardware-based machine. UML cannot destroy the host machine. Furthermore, the UML block devices, also called disks, can be files on the native Linux file system, so you cannot affect the native block devices. This is very useful when you're testing and debugging block operations.
FreeBSD Configuring virtual domains with Cyrus+Postfix in FreeBSD 5.4
Post date: November 30, 2005, 21:11 Category: Software Views: 2160 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Cyrus IMAP is an efficient IMAP server capable of handling a large number of accounts. Its biggest drawback is getting it installed and configured. This tutorial is a step-by-step guide on how to use Cyrus with the Postfix mail transfer agent (MTA). I tested these instructions with FreeBSD 5.4.

Postfix is a replacement for sendmail, the stock MTA that comes in FreeBSD. It is easier to configure and manage than sendmail. If you depend on sendmail, you can still look at the article for the Cyrus part, but you'll need to look elsewhere for the MTA configuration.

Unless otherwise instructed, perform all operations in this tutorial as root. You will need to use the port system. If you are new to it, check Chapter 4 of the FreeBSD Handbook.
FreeBSD Lightweight Web Serving with thttpd
Post date: November 30, 2005, 18:11 Category: Software Views: 1172 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: The Apache HTTP Server is the most popular web server due to its functionality, stability, and maturity. However, this does not make it suitable for all uses: slow machines and embedded systems may have serious problems running it because of its size. Here is where lightweight HTTP servers come into play, as their low-memory footprints deliver decent results without having to swap data back to disk.

Similarly, these small HTTP servers are suitable to serve static content efficiently so as to allow Apache, mod_perl, mod_python, or even servlet containers to handle dynamic requests without tying up memory-hungry children to serve small images. In other words, these applications can serve as a complement to your existing full-featured web server, not as a replacement.

One of these servers is thttpd, a simple, small, portable, fast, and secure HTTP server. Among its features are support for the HTTP/1.1 standard, CGIs, virtual hosts, and IPv6. This article shows how to install and configure this software under NetBSD. I chose NetBSD not only because it is my preferred OS, but also because it has the ability to run on the most disparate old hardware, where thttpd shows its strengths. I had a Macintosh Performa 630 (a 68LC040 chip at 33MHz) running NetBSD/mac68k 2.0 with thttpd on top of it, serving pages to my home network nicely.
Unix+clones How-To: Stream almost anything using VLC
Post date: November 29, 2005, 14:11 Category: Software Views: 2071 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: The VLC media player is an amazing piece of software. In its most basic form it is a lightweight media player that can play almost any audio or video format you throw at it. VLC is also multiplatform in the most extreme sense of the word; it can run on Windows, OSX, Linux and PocketPC / WinCE handhelds along with other systems. VLC works great as a streaming server and video transcoder too.
Unix+clones Downloading without a Browser
Post date: November 29, 2005, 13:11 Category: Software Views: 1007 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: Ever had to download a file so huge over a link so slow that you'd need to keep the web browser open for hours or days? What if you had 40 files linked from a single web page, all of which you needed -- will you tediously click on each one? What if the browser crashes before it can finish? GNU/Linux comes equipped with a handy set of tools for downloading in the background, independent of the browser. This allows you to log out, resume interrupted downloads, and even schedule them to occur during off-peak Net usage hours.
Unix+clones A Tutorial Introduction to The arch Revision Control System
Post date: November 27, 2005, 16:11 Category: Software Views: 797 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: arch is a revision control, source code management, and configuration management tool.

This manual is an arch tutorial: its purpose is to help you get started using arch for the first time, and then learn some of the more advanced features of arch.
Unix+clones How To Configure E 16.7.x
Post date: October 9, 2005, 13:10 Category: Software Views: 798 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: This file documents the configuration files used in Enlightenment 16.7.x but may not match 100% with earlier or later versions. This is a work in progress and will be updated as I learn more and have the time.
Unix+clones Keeping Your Life in Subversion
Post date: October 2, 2005, 11:10 Category: Software Views: 1196 Comments: 0
Tutorial quote: I keep my life in a Subversion repository. For the past five years, I've checked every file I've created and worked on, every email I've sent or received, and every config file I've tweaked into revision control. Five years ago, when I started doing this using CVS, people thought I was nuts to use revision control in this way. Today it's still not a common practice, but thanks to my earlier article "CVS homedir" (Linux Journal, issue 101), I know I'm not alone. In this article I will describe how my new home directory setup is working now that I've switched from CVS to Subversion.

Subversion is a revision-control system. Like the earlier and much cruftier CVS, its purpose is to manage chunks of code, such as free software programs with multiple developers, or in-house software projects involving several employees. Unlike CVS, Subversion handles directories and file renaming reasonably, which is more than sufficient reason to switch to it if you're already using CVS. It also fixes most of CVS's other misfeatures. Subversion still has its warts, though, such as an inability to store symbolic links and some file permissions, and its need for twice as much disk space as you'd expect thanks to the copies of everything in those .svn directories. These problems can be quite annoying when you're keeping your whole home directory in svn. Why bother?